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Cat Stomatitis: A Cure! No. 32

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www.SilverSandsVeterinary.com
P 1-800-838-3368
E-Mail: DonDeForge100@gmail.com
Centers for Oral Care
The New York and New England Animal Dental Health Services
Donald H DeForge, VMD
Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
President of the Society for Veterinary Medical Ethics
No. 32









CAT STOMATITIS!
THERE IS A CURE!

Attention: Doctors,Veterinary Nurses, and Stomatitis Cat advocates.
Today’s Topic in Animal Dentistry outlines my oral surgery using GBR to cure cats from stomatitis.  It is the only surgery to date that can bring complete resolution without remission.

Questions can be directed to DonDeForge100@gmail.com or you can call me at 1-800-838-3368.

Introduction:  Topic In Animal Dentistry #1
The classic treatment of feline Stomatitis with whole mouth extraction or extraction of the teeth distal to the canine teeth has proven to be non-productive in half of the patients treated.
Any where between 50-65% of these felines have only short term improvement with a return of the oral inflammatory …

Cat Stomatitis Part I No. 31

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Animal Dentistry Solutions
No. 31  A BLOG by DH DeForge, VMD Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry 1-800-838-3368 DonDeForge100@gmail.comand DoctorDeForge@yahoo.com
Finding the Cure: CAT STOMATITIS Part I


Dr. DeForge Discusses Breakthrough Surgery for Treatment of Cat Stomatitis Feline Stomatitis Radiowave Radiosurgery with Guided Bone Regeneration
 Feline Stomatitis has been investigated by animal dentists for over twenty-five years. The etiology of this very painful pathology has yet to be determined. It has been, universally, recognized as one of the most painful oral conditions in the feline. The classic treatment for it in general practice has revolved around the usage of corticosteroids and antibiotics to suppress the immune response and treat soft tissue infection-inflammation. The treatment by surgeons and animal dentists, for the last 20 years, after the completion of oral radiology and histopathology diagnostics, has been whole mouth extraction or extraction of all teeth dista…

Cat Stomatitis Part II No. 30

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www.AnimalDentistrySolutions.com No. 30 --  A BLOG by DH DeForge, VMD Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry 1-800-838-3368 DonDeForge100@gmail.comand DoctorDeForge@yahoo.com

Dr. DeForge Develops Breakthrough Surgery for Treatment of Cat Stomatitis Part II Feline Stomatitis Radiowave Radiosurgery with GBR: PART II
The Treatment of Feline Stomatitis: A New Surgical Protocol Combining Radiosurgery with Guided Bone Regeneration [GBR] utilizing Consil®/Bioglass® Synthetic Resorbable Bone Graft Particulate.

Introduction:
The classic treatment of feline Stomatitis with whole mouth extraction or extraction of the teeth distal to the canine teeth has proven to be non-productive.
Anywhere between 50-65% of these felines have only short term improvement with a return of the oral inflammatory condition in 6 to18 months.  On the other hand, the alternative surgery, herein described, utilizing Radiowave Radiosurgery to create full thickness mucoperiosteal flaps, combined with osseous surgery, and bo…

Gingival Hyperplasia and Radiosurgery No.29

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Donald H DeForge, VMD
Silvers Sands Veterinary
Milford Veterinary Hospital-Urgent and General Care
17 Seemans Lane-Milford, CT-06460
P 203-877-3221
F-203-877-8301
E-Mail-DonDeForge100@gmail.com
Centers for Oral Care
Tri-State Advanced Oral Medicine and Oral Surgery
Fellow of the Academy of Veterinary Dentistry
No. 29






Topics in Companion Animal Dentistry: Gingival Hyperplasia and Radiosurgery Historical Background: Gingival Hyperplasia is a common findings in Boxers, Bulldogs, Pit Bulls, and Cocker Spaniels
along with other breeds. Its etiology is not known but a genetic link to certain breeds is
suspected.  There is a proliferative and abnormal growth of gingival tissue with pseudopocket
formation. These pockets lead to attachment loss with food, hair, and debris entrapment.
This condition should never be ignored because it will lead to advanced periodontal pathology
and oral pain. Diagnosis: Diagnosis is with Incisional biopsy.  Gingival hyperplasia can mimic epulis; benign invasive
oral …